Courses

REQUIRED COURSES

Psychology and Counseling Courses

The required courses for the low-residency MA in Psychology and Clinical Mental Health Counseling Programs are meant to define the foundational minimum that each student will acquire in the required study areas. In addition to this foundation, each student brings issues of their own interests and passions to each course.  Each degree program has its own requirements and the respective addenda should be read to understand them. View a complete list of Psychology and Counseling course descriptions.

Courses required for each degree reflect not only the philosophy of the program faculty, but also the common requirements of licensing states and those national organizations of interest to Master’s level therapists (e.g., CAMPP, NBCC, and CACREP).

ELECTIVE COURSES

To complete the low-residency MA in Psychology and Counseling Program, students work with their academic advisor and course mentors to create elective courses that serve their personal interests and professional goals. Contact the Admissions Office to learn more about elective course design in the MA in Psychology and Counseling Program.

SEXUAL ORIENTATION CONCENTRATION CORE COURSES

Students who pursue the Sexual Orientation Concentration are required to take four core courses, in addition to required program courses, as well as five related area courses. View Core Courses in this concentration.

REQUIRED COURSES:  PSYCHOLOGY

The following course descriptions for the low-residency Masters in Psychology Program are meant to define the foundational minimum each student will attain in the required study areas. In addition to this foundation, each student will bring issues pertaining to their own interests and passions.

Full descriptions for each course may be found in the degree addendum.

All courses, if successfully completed, earn three credits.

REQUIRED COURSES:  CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING (CMHC)

The following course descriptions for the low-residency Masters in CMHC are meant to define the foundational minimum each student will attain in the required study areas. In addition to this foundation, each student will bring issues pertaining to their own interests and passions.

Full descriptions for each course may be found in the CMHC degree addendum.

All courses, if successfully completed, earn three credits.

Program addenda are available in digital or hard copy format upon request. Please contact the Academic Services Office to request a copy.

Request more information from an Admissions Counselor.

The Faculty

The Psychology and Counseling Faculty members work one-on-one with students as faculty advisors throughout the semester, as well as facilitating group studies, teaching workshops at residency, and acting as second readers to students’ final projects. Our faculty is comprised of national and international scholar practitioners with extensive experience supporting students taking charge of their learning. Faculty members’ work with students is focused, clear, and rigorous.

Learn more about our faculty.

Location

Twice a year, at the start of each semester, students attend an intensive eight-day residency at the College’s Plainfield, Vermont campus. Residencies are a rich time of exploration, connection, and planning.

Low-Residency Model

At the start of the semester, students attend an intensive eight-day residency in Vermont, followed by 16 weeks of independent work and self-reflection in close collaboration with a faculty advisor and course mentor. Goddard pioneered this format nearly a half century ago to meet the needs of adult students with professional, family, and other obligations seeking learning experiences grounded in the real-world.

Residencies are a time to explore, network, learn, witness, and share with peers, staff, and faculty. Students work with advisors and peers in close-knit advising groups to forge individualized study plans that describe their learning objectives for the semester.

Working closely with their faculty advisors, and supported by fellow learners, students identify areas of study, personal goals, relevant resources, and avenues to achieve these goals. Students also attend and are invited to help organize workshops, keynote addresses, celebrations and other events intended to stimulate, inspire, and challenge.

This low-residency model combines the breadth of a collaborative community with the focus of personalized learning, enhanced by insightful exchanges with a faculty advisor and course mentors.