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Goddard at AWP Conference & Bookfair

Goddard at AWP Conference & Bookfair
Wed, 02/26/2014 - 12:00pm to Sat, 03/01/2014 - 12:00am
Seattle, WA 98101

 

Visit us at booth B1.

Goddard College faculty, alumni and students are among the 1,900 panelists presenting at the largest gathering of established and emerging writers in the U.S., the 2014 Association of Writers & Writing Programs Conference & Bookfair, at the Washington State Convention Center & Sheraton Seattle Hotel.

Goddard is a regular AWP sponsor. Look for our booth B1 on the exhibit floor and meet with Goddard MFA in Creative Writing and Goddard BFA in Creative Writing alumni, students, and faculty.

Members of the Goddard community are scheduled to participate in the following panel discussions, pedagogy events, and readings:

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Four Ways Blogging Benefits a Writer
with Goddard alumni Isla McKetta and Ann Hedreen
Thursday, February 27, 2014
9:00 am to 10:15 am
Room 604, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
(Isla McKetta, Rebecca Bridge, Elissa Washuta, Ann Hedreen, Jack Remick) Creation, Career, Promotion, and Conversation. Your blog is more than a tool for creating the dreaded platform. It can be the hub of your online activity and a source of inspiration. Five digitally-savvy authors share stories of how their blogs inspire them to write, build relationships, and help them get published. We’ll cover Internet best practices and ways blogging gets you noticed by search engines and the people who use them. Learn how being yourself online is your very best asset.

 

Grub Street National Book Prizewinners Reading
with Rahna Reiko Rizzuto, Goddard MFA faculty
Thursday, February 27, 2014
12:00 pm to 1:15 pm
Willow Room, Sheraton Seattle, 2nd Floor
(Rebecca Seiferle, Ellen Cassedy, Sheri Joseph, Rick Barot, Reiko Rizzuto) This reading features a diverse and dynamic cross-section of authors who have won Grub Street's prestigious National Book Prize in Fiction, Non-Fiction and Poetry. Literary merit is the top criterion for this prize, which celebrates a variety of styles, influences and genres and is the only significant award designed for non-debut writers from outside New England.

 

The Third I: The Writer as Mediator in Memoir and Personal Narrative
with Aimee Liu, Goddard MFA faculty
Thursday, February 27, 2014
12:00 pm to 1:15 pm
Room 202, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 2
(Janice Gary,  Aimee Liu,  Richard Hoffman,  Jerald Walker,  Meredith Hall) As both subject and writer, memoirists must mediate the I of the past and the I of the present with a third I: the writer who has both lived the material and shapes it. In this session, authors of literary memoir discuss the distinct challenges of creating literature from life that is both truthful and compelling and how they use the authorial I to find the voice to narrate the story, the structure to support the narrative and selection of material from the vast archives of personal history.

 

What's Next? Pressures and Opportunities in Undergraduate Writing Programs
with Janet Sylvester, BFA program director
Thursday, February 27, 2014
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm
Room 2A, Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
(Audrey Colombe, Kathlene Postma, Janet Sylvester, Lisa Norris, Abi Curtis) Undergraduate programs in creative writing develop student writers who will inevitably face a competitive future in publishing and editing, M.F.A. or other graduate programs, and the job market. Directors from writing programs (U.S. and abroad) will discuss an array of curricular choices made in recent revisions to undergraduate writing programs. The conversation will cover traditional, online, and low rez options, describe choices and outcomes, and pro-con the most recent developments.

 

Beef Jerky, Bras, and Car Parts: What We Write About When We Write for Money
with Ryan Boudinot, MFA faculty
Thursday, February 27, 2014
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm
Room 303, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3
(Rachel Kessler, Anastacia Tolbert, Matthew Dickman, Jan Wallace, Ryan Boudinot) F. Scott Fitzgerald did it, Salman Rushdie did it, Don DeLillo did it, and it is no surprise that many serious writers have made their rent by writing copy for advertisements. The poets and novelists on this panel discuss their anecdotal experiences of technical and review writing (including about lingerie, car parts, and porn), and how the peculiarities of this work sustained, flattened, inspired or challenged their own literary writing and sense of self. Sellouts? Or workhorses? You decide.

 

Let's Avoid a Quick Death, Please: Starting and Sustaining a New Literary Publication
with alumnus James R. Gapinski (MFAW '13)
Thursday, February 27, 2014
3:00 pm to 4:15 pm
Room 301, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3
This panel explores the process of starting and sustaining a new literary publication. Countless small presses and journals launch every year only to die after a couple issues. Let's talk with some people who avoided that fate. This panel will discuss how to choose the right publishing medium, secure funding, attract readers, and deal with unexpected hurdles.

 

Beyond the Memoir: a New Approach to Teaching Creative Writing to Senior Citizens
with David Robson, Nancy McCurry, Paul Pat, Lloyd Noonan, Goddard alumni
Thursday, February 27, 2014
4:30 pm to 5:45 pm
Room 3A, Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
Life story workshops are prevalent in senior citizen facilities in the United States. Yet  the memoir is not ideal for every older adult with a yearning to write. In fact, many aren’t ready or, more commonly, don’t have the desire to go down this road. In Beyond the Memoir, educators will discuss innovative practices to bring out the best creative works from this growing population. Leave with techniques to excite older students and concepts to immediately craft or expand your own program.

Kelsey Street Press: 40 Years of Publishing Innovative Writing By Women
with Bhanu Kapil, Goddard MFA faculty
Thursday, February 27, 2014
4:30 pm to 5:45 pm
Room LL5, Western New England MFA Annex, Lower Level
(Rena Rosenwasser, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Bhanu Kapil, Hazel White, Patricia Dienstfrey) This year marks the 40th anniversary of Kelsey Street Press, which was created to address the marginalization of women writers by small press and mainstream publishers. Join us for a celebratory poetry reading featuring several award-winning Kelsey Street authors as well as founding members of the press.

 

The Literary Legacy of Nirvana and Kurt Cobain
with Ryan Boudinot, MFA faculty
Thursday, February 27, 2014
4:30 pm to 5:45 pm
Room 302, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3
(Matthew Batt, Paisley Rekdal, Melanie Thon, Ryan Boudinot, Jason Skipper) “He saved us all,” says fellow Washington native Sherman Alexie of Kurt Cobain. Though neither Cobain nor Nirvana created the “Seattle sound,” they did more than any other band to lionize and catapult it, resulting in a legacy that spread beyond music and into life, politics, and literature. On this, the 20th anniversary of Cobain’s death, panelists will reflect on the literary influence of Nirvana, as well as the impact and aftermath of Cobain’s life and death.

 

Friday, February 28, 2014

Building Space for Comics in the Creative Writing Program
with Justin Hall, Goddard MFA student
Friday, February 28, 2014
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm
Room 3B, Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
(Justin Hall, Nathan Holic, Rich Shivenner, Claire Stephens, Jeffrey Chapman) How do we write comics? Comics and graphic novels tend to be thought of, first and foremost, as a visual medium. But more and more people are coming to comics from writing backgrounds and creative writing programs. Are all the tools we learn writing prose and poetry relevant? How do we translate our skills as writers into the graphic medium? This panel will examine the challenges facing a writer in a graphic world and different ways to navigate these challenges.

 

The Art of the Book Review
with Michael Klein and Darcey Steinke, Goddard MFA faculty
Friday, February 28, 2014
1:30 pm to 2:45 pm
Room 607, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
(Tony Leuzzi, Michael Klein, Craig Teicher, Darcey Steinke, Joseph Salvatore)
Thousands of books are published each year. We are lead to many of them by engaging, knowing reviews. A well-written review will investigate the mysteries deep reading affords, and it will please as well as inform, because it has style. The five widely published writers/critics on this panel will discuss the review as a genre in its own right, a unique artistic form that contributes to the formation of taste, raises the level of
public discourse, and establishes critical reputation.

Saturday, March 1, 2014

What Are We Projecting?: American Poetry and Poetics in the Era of the Project
with Bhanu Kapil, Goddard MFA faculty
Saturday, March 1, 2014
10:30 am to 11:45 am
Room 606, Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
(Sasha Steensen,  Catherine Wagner,  Rodrigo Toscano,  Ronaldo Wilson,  Bhanu Kapil) Whatever happened to books of poems in which each poem was separate and distinct? Increasingly, American poets with a range of aesthetic sensibilities have begun to describe their writing in terms of the “project.” This panel will investigate the predominance of the “project” poem and examine the social demands to frame poetics as project. By exploring limitations and advantages of projects and critiquing their own “projects,” panelists will propose alternatives to project-modeled inquiry.

 

Out of History: Transforming Research into Literature
With Micheline Aharonian Marcom and Aimee Liu, Goddard MFA faculty
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Noon to 1:15 pm
Room 3A, Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
(Micheline Aharonian Marcom, Christina Baker Kline, Aimee Liu) Family archives and other historical documents can be compelling resources for novelists, but they come with pitfalls and responsibilities. How can fiction honor the truth of the past? How do we walk the line between basing our work on facts and falling into research rapture or, worse, inadvertent plagiarism? Three established authors of historically-based novels will discuss strategies for creating original new work that builds on the past without submitting to - or merely repeating - history.

 

A Reading by Hugo House Writers-In-Residence, Past and Present
with Ryan Boudinot, MFA faculty
Saturday, March 1, 2014
Noon to 1:15 pm
Room 304, Western New England MFA Annex, Level 3
(Peter Mountford, Ed Skoog, Karen Finneyfrock, Ryan Boudinot, Angela Fountas)  Hugo House, Seattle’s writing center, is the nexus of the city’s bustling literary community. Every year, two published writers a poet and a prose writer are selected to be Hugo House’s writers-in-residence. They hold free weekly office hours for anyone who is seeking feedback on their writing. Five recent appointees will read their work and discuss this vital program that serves a hundreds of writers of all ages and experience levels in Seattle.